Comments on: Where can an international lawyer go adventuring? http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/ Speak Victorian, Think Pagan Wed, 21 Nov 2012 23:12:46 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.7.1 By: Curzon http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397523 Tue, 22 Mar 2011 15:52:34 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397523 An unsophisticated jibe, my dear fellow. While I would admit that UK firms have better drafting that US law firms, you can’t fault a lawyer for following the clear form required by the US SEC.

Generally, I would say that US law firms tend to be the most commercial and strategic, although they tend to make decisions on behalf of their clients, which I think is risky and inappropriate. British firms tend to be more technically perfectionist but less practical. (I say this having worked at both types of institutions.) I have a personal bias for Australian lawyers who I think are serve up the right balance.

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By: Tiu Fu Fong http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397518 Tue, 22 Mar 2011 14:34:02 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397518 Give me a UK, Australian or even NZ lawyer over a US lawyer for international counsel any day. US legal documents are generally like something you’d see in the pre-plain legal drafts days of the 1970s or 80s. Particularly annoying are the ALL CAPS clauses, which seem to abound in Reg 144A security offering documents. My favourite comment to make in mark up on those was “IS THIS CLAUSE MORE LEGALLY EFFECTIVE IF IT’S ALL IN CAPS? IF NOT, lower case please.” Then a US lawyer explained to me that the clause had to reflect the relevant statute exactly and the statute text was all in caps, so no US law firm dared try writing the clause in lower case.

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By: Curzon http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397387 Wed, 16 Mar 2011 16:14:52 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397387 Singapore and China both have a high demand for lawyers. Moscow also has room for the right lawyers.

Abu Dhabi, Qatar, and especially Riyadh are hot in the Middle East.

There are other hidden opportunities. I know a number of foreign lawyers in three cities in Oman. Indonesia is a growing, if restricted, market and there are more and more foreign lawyers there, although many are based out of Singapore.

There is always room for a lawyer looking to go to a “frontier” jurisdiction where there is new FDI. Iraq was such a jurisdiction many years ago.

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By: Gonzalez http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397386 Wed, 16 Mar 2011 15:01:57 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397386 I have graduated from Law School in Europe in 2009 and would like to work in a foreign country which can accept me.

Which countries in the world need lawyers and can easily work there?
European countries are not an option.

Thanks

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By: Michael http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397380 Tue, 15 Mar 2011 06:02:24 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397380 Why don’t the countries with laws based on the Napoleonic Code have similar reciprocity as those based on Common Law?

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By: Curzon http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397313 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 13:03:58 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397313 Joe, that system — the QLTT — has been abolished as of September 2010. The new system, the QLTS, puts New York and Australian and Pakistani lawyers on the same footing — in line with the EU directive/regulations/rules/whatever.

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By: Joe Jones http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397308 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 08:05:35 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397308 The EU reciprocity is a bit different from the intra-commonwealth reciprocity. If you are Australian, you simply take the ethics portion of the English solicitor’s exam and you are a full-fledged English solicitor. The EU rules let you practice using your home country title in any other EU country, but you aren’t considered to be qualified under that country’s law unless you go through the cumbersome local admission process.

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By: yea http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397303 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 03:12:26 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397303 what did curzon do to be able to get the job he has now?
i mean, i would really love to do something like him and be an international lawyer, but … how ?

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By: Roy Berman http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397264 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 09:02:25 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397264 After the Japanese bar exam is no longer open to people who have not graduated from law school, will there be any expedited certification for those that are already lawyers in other countries, as in the case of the brief 1 year law school course in the US?

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By: Curzon http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397263 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 06:57:56 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397263 “But there is no similar reciprocity among the many civil law countries of the world, as far as I know.”

Well… the EU has pretty broad reciprocity, and the UK recently adapted its system to match EU requirements, so becoming admitted in the UK for a Hong Kong or Zambian lawyer is now the same as it is for a German or Greek lawyer. Much of the Arab world has pretty simple reciprocity that is based more on language than qualification. So that covers a lot of the globe.

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By: Joe Jones http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397262 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 05:06:21 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397262 Good round-up.

It may be worth noting that the reciprocity you mention under item 2 above is basically limited to countries within the English-speaking world. Solicitors in England, Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore (among other legally similar countries) can swap their qualifications around pretty easily, and it’s also a relatively straightforward process for American lawyers to qualify in many other English-speaking countries, though qualifying for full admission in most US states requires at least a year of US law school *and* passing the entire bar exam. But there is no similar reciprocity among the many civil law countries of the world, as far as I know.

In addition to “project management,” the big-swinging international lawyers are often called in because they know what questions to ask and what avenues to explore with the various “local” lawyers — they have an idea of all the potential local legal pitfalls and can tailor the deal so as to make all the local lawyers happy.

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By: Mutantfrog Travelogue » Blog Archive » Where can an international lawyer go adventuring? http://cominganarchy.com/2011/03/09/where-can-an-international-lawyer-go-adventuring/comment-page-1/#comment-397261 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 04:32:21 +0000 http://cominganarchy.com/?p=10652#comment-397261 [...] Comments closed—please join in the fray at ComingAnarchy.com [...]

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