DADT Repealed

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About Younghusband

Sir Francis Edward Younghusband (1863-1942) was a British explorer, army officer, military-political officer, and foreign correspondent born in India who led expeditions into Manchuria, Kashgar, and Tibet. He three times tried and failed to scale Mt. Everest and journeyed from China to India, crossing the Gobi desert and the Mustagh Pass (alt. c.19,000 ft/5,791 m) of the Karakoram mountain range in modern day Pakistan. Convinced of Russian designs on British interests in India, Younghusband proactively engaged in the nineteenth century spying and conflict over Central Asia between the British and the Russians known as the Great Game. "Younghusband" is a Canadian who has spent a number of years bouncing back and forth between his home country and Japan. Fluent in Japanese and English with experience in numerous other languages from Spanish to Georgian, Younghusband has travelled throughout Asia. He graduated with an MA from the War Studies Department at the Royal Military College of Canada, where he focussed on the Japanese oil industry and energy security issues. He has recently returned to Canada from Japan, and is working in the technology sector.
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7 Responses to DADT Repealed

  1. spandrell says:

    So younghusband is the token liberal in this blog?
    I can imagine what the original Younghusband would have thought of having open homosexuals in the military.

  2. Alfred Russel Wallace says:

    A good step forward – civil rights for all!!!…. And its long overdue, despite whatever views the original Younghusband, Chirol, Munro-Ferguson or Curzon might have said…..

  3. Roy Berman says:

    I may be wrong, but I suspect that all of this blog’s authors agree on this topic.

  4. Younghusband says:

    “token liberal”? I’ve been called worse.

    Besides, the historical Younghusband was pretty liberal for his time, into cosmic rays and free love. One of his biographers, Patrick French called him a “premature hippy”, saying:

    … brought up an Evangelical Christian, read his way into Tolstoyan simplicity, experienced a revelatory vision in the mountains of Tibet, toyed with telepathy in Kashmir, proposed a new faith based on virile racial theory, then transformed it into what Bertrand Russell called ‘a religion of atheism.’

    Times change, as do attitudes. And DADT was long overdue.

  5. seouldout says:

    I saw this DADT popping up everywhere and thought it was a variant of DATY. Imagine my surprise!

    Anyway, citizens have their rights. A tax-paying US-citizen homosexual has as much right to join the military as a tax-paying US-citizen heterosexual. As it is currently non-Americans can join the US military but openly homosexual Americans can’t, and this strikes me as perverse. Moreover, I don’t recall a US-citizen closeted homosexual being exploited by the adversaries. The ones who have been convicted for espionage have been heterosexual. Perhaps heterosexuals are the greater risk? Of course I’m being waggish. Or am I?

    Want to keep homosexuals out? Then make homosexuality illegal. Until then suck it up and move on.

  6. Eddie says:

    We only lost more than 14,000 American patriots to this idiotic policy that cost taxpayers upwards of half a billion dollars. Countless operations were rendered more difficult because talented linguists in uniform who happened to be gay were kicked out. God knows how many closeted gays were blackmailed by foreign intelligence agencies.

    Most who have served know damn well they’d rather serve with a gay than a thief, a malingerer, or a malcontent. That’s not to say there won’t be some problems (some more protracted than others, such as figuring out benefit systems in a country where gays lack the basic civil right to marry in more than 40 states), but we can handle this. Honestly, women in the military was and remains a far bigger issue, but its un-PC to talk about that openly.

  7. Roy Berman says:

    “Moreover, I don’t recall a US-citizen closeted homosexual being exploited by the adversaries. The ones who have been convicted for espionage have been heterosexual. Perhaps heterosexuals are the greater risk? Of course I’m being waggish. Or am I? ”

    A quick search found this page on Google Books – http://books.google.co.jp/books?id=sWsC216-e9EC&pg=PA64&lpg=PA64&dq=cold+war+homosexual+blackmail&source=bl&ots=We6sBwN6SJ&sig=_Dq2oEsOqqBTd6qIQI5YnM72OhU&hl=ja&ei=DwsUTZLZIousugOl4Zz-DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=cold%20war%20homosexual%20blackmail&f=false

    To summarize – although no case of homosexual blackmail by the Soviets was every found, the theory was used to justify a total purge of homosexuals from government during the Cold War. The obvious solution of allowing them to serve un-closeted was presumably not even considered.