What part of legal [U.S.] immigration don’t you understand?

Because it’s all explained real simple right here.

About Curzon

Lord George Nathaniel Curzon (1859 - 1925) entered the British House of Commons as a Conservative MP in 1886, where he served as undersecretary of India and Foreign Affairs. He was appointed Viceroy of India at the turn of the 20th century where he delineated the North West Frontier Province, ordered a military expedition to Tibet, and unsuccessfully tried to partition the province of Bengal during his six-year tenure. Curzon served as Leader of the House of Lords in Prime Minister Lloyd George's War Cabinet and became Foreign Secretary in January 1919, where his most famous act was the drawing of the Curzon Line between a new Polish state and Russia. His publications include Russia in Central Asia (1889) and Persia and the Persian Question (1892). In real life, "Curzon" is a US citizen from the East Coast who has been a financial analyst, freelance translator, and university professor; he is currently on assignment in Tokyo.
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6 Responses to What part of legal [U.S.] immigration don’t you understand?

  1. Rommel says:

    Few would argue that a massive overhaul of our legal immigration system is in order. Many of us (especially those who have attended university) personally know resident aliens, with nothing but love for the country, who would be valuable members of our workforce and community.

    I for one know a brilliant German citizen, studying NUCLEAR ENGINEERING(!) in Texas, who has all but given up achieving citizenship. The last I had heard, he was forced to move back to Munich and was still trying. Bjorn had a deep admiration for the United States that one rarely finds outside of first-generation immigrants – or in his case, prospective immigrants. He would praise for hours everything from the meritocractic nature of our society to the deep sense of patriotism that most Americans feel. If we continue to let such men fall through the cracks of legal citizenship, we risk losing the qualities that he so admires and that is a damned shame…

  2. Rick Anderson says:

    Why should US citizens feel obligated to support illegal aliens? When so many Americans are losing jobs and can not support their families, why should the US be allowing competition from foreign nationals?

    We need immigration policies that put the interests of US citizens before those of foreign nationals! Why are foreign nationals with H1-B visas working at US government agencies while many US citizens with those skills are not being employed? The reason is that these government contractors can hire foreign workers at half the cost of US citizens and exploit them. Why don’t our politicans care about this situation…they don’t because they have been bought and paid for by business lobbyists who want CHEAP LABOR!

    I am tired of paying higher taxes to support benefits for illegal workers and foreign workers on government visas competing with US workers. The governments of these workers do not allow large numbers of US workers to compete for jobs in their countries, why should the US?

  3. Curzon says:

    Rick: what part of legal US immigration don’t you understand?

  4. Rick Anderson says:

    We should be severly limiting ALL immigration until we understand how adding more immigrants to our population affects the availability of jobs and scarce resources!

  5. Pingback: tdaxp » Blog Archive » Reform the Immigration System

  6. tdaxp says:

    On my blog, Edgewise [1] though Rick Anderson had some points that should not be casually dismissed.

    Very well. I will seriously dismiss them.

    Why should US citizens feel obligated to support illegal aliens?

    I don’t know what Rick is talking about. Is he concerned with educating youngsters who are in this country? (If so, would he prefer a less educated society?)

    When so many Americans are losing jobs and can not support their families, why should the US be allowing competition from foreign nationals?

    Does Rick also favor suspending car imports from Japan, electronic imports from China, sugar imports from the Caribbean, and so on, as well?

    Why are foreign nationals with H1-B visas working at US government agencies while many US citizens with those skills are not being employed?

    Because the rest of us would prefer a competent government workforce to a government workforce that operates as part of the welfare system.

    The governments of these workers do not allow large numbers of US workers to compete for jobs in their countries, why should the US?

    Is Rick upset that his dreams of working as a campesino are being cruelly denied him, or is he wondering why the US citizenry enjoys a better selection of labor than the citizens of other countries?

    [1] http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2008/12/28/reform-the-immigration-system.html#comment-203156