Misunderestimated

“If the Lower House is dissolved, we will take it as the chance of a lifetime, and say ‘thank-you’.”
Democratic Party of Japan Secretary General Tatsuo Kawabata, 7 August 2005
(The Democrats lost about a third of their seats, dropping from 171 to 113, in yesterday’s election. Kawabata also lost his directly elected seat, although he remains in the house through the proportional representation system.)

“Koizumi commits political suicide”
J Sean Curtin – Asia Times, 9 August 2005
(Koizumi’s party won a record-high percentage of the Diet seats in yesterday’s election.)

About Curzon

Lord George Nathaniel Curzon (1859 - 1925) entered the British House of Commons as a Conservative MP in 1886, where he served as undersecretary of India and Foreign Affairs. He was appointed Viceroy of India at the turn of the 20th century where he delineated the North West Frontier Province, ordered a military expedition to Tibet, and unsuccessfully tried to partition the province of Bengal during his six-year tenure. Curzon served as Leader of the House of Lords in Prime Minister Lloyd George's War Cabinet and became Foreign Secretary in January 1919, where his most famous act was the drawing of the Curzon Line between a new Polish state and Russia. His publications include Russia in Central Asia (1889) and Persia and the Persian Question (1892). In real life, "Curzon" is a US citizen from the East Coast who has been a financial analyst, freelance translator, and university professor; he is currently on assignment in Tokyo.
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2 Responses to Misunderestimated

  1. Grendel says:

    The media said the same when Schröder asked president Köhler to dissolve the Bundestag, and this weekends elections are not as clear-cut as the CDU would like them to be… let’s hope whoever wins gets a clear mandate.

  2. Curzon says:

    The LDP even “misunderestimated their own power:”:http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/20050914TDY04002.htm

    The LDP even won one more seat in Tokyo under the proportional representation system than the number of candidates it fielded. As a result, the party’s seat was apportioned to the Social Democratic Party instead.

    Yikes!

    And this:

    In the southern Kanto region bloc, an administrative worker at LDP headquarters who was fielded as a candidate to complete the list of candidates also secured election.